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TTT#335 Play Youth Voices "It's not a game" Anthony Flores, Christina Cantrill, Emily Goligoski, Karen Fasimpaur, Paul Oh 2/6/13


61:28 minutes (42.2 MB)

On this episode of TTT, we finish Digital Learning Day http://www.digitallearningday.org/ with a conversation about open badges.

Paul Allison takes some time to reflect on a the use of badges in his high school English class, and look who joins him:

Paul Allison's profile photoPaul Oh's profile photoChristina Cantrill's profile photoKaren Fasimpaur's profile photoEmily Goligoski's profile photoAnthony Flores's profile photomonika hardy's profile photo

+Anthony Flores http://youthvoices.net/users/anthonyf- One of the first students to earn 15 badges and earn a credit in English: http://youthvoices.net/play

+Emily Goligoski, Open Badges Design & Community Lead at the Mozilla foundation who can help us think about Mozilla's Open Badge Infrastructure and Badge Backpacks. http://openbadges.org/en-US/

+Paul Oh, Senior Program Associate at National Writing Project, involved in many technology projects.

+Christina Cantrill who works with the National Writing Project and directs the Digital Is project http://digitalis.nwp.org

+Karen Fasimpaur who currently runs a small educational technology company that works with mobile technology integration in schools.http://www.k12handhelds.com/ She also runs the K12 Open Ed web sitehttp://www.k12opened.com/blog/and more!

+monika hardy, and +Paul Allison are on this episode as hosts, although Paul asked Karen if she would facilitate this episode of TTT because he wanted to talk about his experiments with badges, using P2PU, Open Badge Backpacks, and Youth Voices.

Enjoy listening to us trying figure out what we've been up to!


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TTT#334 The Future of English with Andrew McGuire, Meenoo Rami, Bryan Loftis, Troy Hicks, Scott Shelhart, Chris Lehmann 01.30.13


59:29 minutes (40.84 MB)

This episode of TTT is a conversation about the future of the teaching and schooling in general.The idea for this week's episode of TTT came about when +Andrew McGuire, a student of +Chris Sloan's who had graduated from high school last year, told Chris that he wants to be an English teacher. But he wants a different kind of education than a lot of what he has received. Chris writes:

He’s an education reformer at heart, and a lot of what he described as his ideal educational environment aligns with some of the people who’ve joined us on Teachers Teaching Teachers recently. He’s talking about connected learning in third spaces that involve a maker approach and is inquiry-based. So what would you tell an 18-year old who’s thinking about becoming an English teacher? Not only what Andrew and others like him should study, but how they should go about their teacher education?

Andrew Maguire's profile photoMeenoo Rami's profile photoBryan Loftis's profile photoTroy Hicks's profile photoScott Shelhart's profile photoChris Lehmann's profile photo

Along with Andrew we are joined by these educators: Meenoo Rami, Bryan Loftis, Troy Hicks, Scott Shelhart, Chris Lehmann.

Enjoy!


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Teachers Teaching Teachers #206 - Will our students find the oil spill compelling? 3rd in a series - 06.23.10


41:57 minutes (9.6 MB)

On this episode of Teachers Teaching Teachers -- the third in our summer series on the Gulf oil failure -- Paul Allison and Susan Ettenheim are joined by Chris Sloan and Andrea Zeller. We talk about building curriculum around the Gulf oil spill and other topics, wondering how to keep student self-motivated inquiry at the center of our work while also introducing topics such as the environment, art history, obesity, AP English, or the earthquake in Haiti and other current events.

  • Chris Sloan teaches at Judge Memorial Catholic High School in Salt Lake City, and he is a member of the Wasatch Range Writing Project. He teaches digital photography, media studies and AP English. Chris, Paul and Susan and their students have been working together on a school-based social network, Youth Voices for the last six years.
     
  • Andrea Zellner has been a frequent guest on TTT this summer, we are delighted to say! Andrea is a former high school teacher in Michigan, who taught both English and Biology. Currently Andrea works for the Red Cedar Writing Project.
     
  • Susan Ettenheim teaches at Eleanor Roosevelt High School in New York City. Susan and Paul have been doing Teachers Teaching Teachers together for almost five years. Susan teaches computer arts, art, and digital photography, and she is the librarian as well. This year Susan is also teaching a Caribbean Art History course for the Virtual High School.
     
  • Paul Allison teaches at the East-West School of International Studies in Flushing, Queens. He is also the Tech Liaison for the New York City Writing Project. Paul teaches English and he started a school/community garden this spring.

We hope you enjoy this conversation between four veteran teachers. Just as we build on each others ideas, we hope you build on ours and let us know what you are thinking in the comments below.

We invite you to join us each Wednesday this summer to listen to teachers from the Gulf and to hear how teachers are planning to bring these issues into their classrooms this fall.

Join us at http://EdTechTalk.com/live at 9:00pm Eastern / 6:00pm Pacific USA Wednesdays / 01:00 UTC Thursdays World Times

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Teachers Teaching Teachers #187 The Socially Networked Classroom: Teaching New Media w/ William Kist & Mike Slowinski - 02.17.10


34:27 minutes (15.77 MB)

This episode of Teachers Teaching Teachers, was recorded during a live webcast back in the middle of February. We think you will enjoy this conversation with William Kist and Mike Slowlinski, one of the teachers who is featured in William Kist's new book, The Socially Networked Classroom: Teaching in the New Media Age. Troy Hicks has a thought-provoking question to ask toward the end of this podcast as well. Get the book, and learn along with all of us.

29476_Kist_Socially_Networked_72ppiRGB_150pixw.jpg

William Kist

William Kist is an associate professor at Kent State University, where he teaches undergraduate and graduate courses focused on adolescent literacy. He has been a middle school and high school English teacher; a Language Arts and Social Studies curriculum coordinator; and a consultant and trainer for school districts across the United States. Kist has over 30 national and international conference presentations and 10 published articles to his credit, including his book The Socially Networked Classroom: Teaching in the New Media Age (2010, Corwin Press.). In addition to his work in education, Kist has worked as a video/film producer and musician. Kist is editing one independent feature film, Summer’s Journey, and is developing his original screenplay, Field Trip, to be filmed as an independent feature in 2008.

View Bill Kist’s Resume/Vita, Publication, and Workshops,

This podcast is another in a series of Teachers Teaching Teachers shows to feature the authors of a recent outcrop of books on new media and literacy (Using Technology to Improve Adolescent Writing: 186. Copyright Clarity: 184, 135, The Digital Writing Workshop: 172, 171, 170, Teaching the New Writing: 157156, 155, Teaching Writing Using Blogs, Wikis, and other Digital Tools: 138)  Perhaps we have the makings of a new discipline here, or at least a budding new branch on the tree of academic inquiry. See the National Writing Project's list at Teaching Now: Digital Writing Books. What would you add to this list? Let us know by adding a comment below.

 

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Shmoop - new learning and teaching resource for literature & history

Hi all,

I was looking to contact the site owners, but I saw their suggestion to post in the forum instead. So, here I am.

I work on Shmoop http://www.shmoop.com

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