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TTT#367 Why Open Matters When We Share Curriculum - Connected Educator Month Series (2 of 5) 10.9.13


59:14 minutes (40.67 MB)

On this episode of TTT, recorded on 10.9.13 as part of our series of Connected Educator Month http://connectededucators.org shows, we explore why open matters when we share curriculum.

We are joined by:

Greg Mcverry's profile photo Greg McVerry Christina Cantrill's profile photo Christina Cantrill Johanna Paraiso's profile photo Johanna Paraiso
Karen Fasimpaur's profile photo Karen Fasimpaur Joann Boettcher's profile photo Joann Boettcher Sheri Edwards's profile photo Sheri Edwards

Here's a Digital Is http://digitalis.nwp.org/ resource on this topic, written by one of our frequent (and always welcomed) guests on TTT, Karen Fasimpaur:

Why does "open" matter?

Creative Commons Licence

There is a lot of talk about "open" these days. It's the new black. It's cool and hip, and marketeers are calling their products "open," whether they are or not.

But what does "open" really mean? And why should we care?

For the purposes of this discussion, "open" refers to content that can be remixed, modified, and redistributed by anyone.

There's an endless supply of free content on the Internet. How is open different from everything else that is free? In the United States, any content that is not public domain (by virtue of its age or designation as such by the creator) is copyrighted, whether or not it is indicated as such. Subject to certain excpeptions such as fair use, the copyright owner has exclusive rights to reproduce, prepare derivatives, and distribute the copyrighted work (section 107 of the copyright law).*

Open-licensed content, though, can be reused and redistributed without prior permission.

The most common open licenses are those provided by Creative Commons. An attachment below summarizes the various licenses and gives more info about open resources.

As educators, why should we care about open? Some of the reasons include economics, remixability, and promoting a culture of sharing. We'll explore each of these in the chapters that follow.

BROWSE THIS RESOURCE

- See more at: http://digitalis.nwp.org/resource/3837#sthash.ewnNpvyc.dpuf


Click Read more to see the chat that was happening during this live webcast.


TTT #286 Open Education: CONNECT... COLLECT... CREATE... SHARE... with Cable Green, Mary Lou Forward, Karen Fasimpaur 2.29.12


67:40 minutes (15.49 MB)

On this episode of Teachers Teaching Teachers, Chris Sloan and Scott Shelhart host a conversation about Open Education. They were talking just before the first ever Open Education Week which took "place 5-10 March 2012 online and in locally hosted events around the world.”

As it says on http://www.openeducationweek.org ”The purpose of Open Education Week is to raise awareness of the open education movement and its impact on teaching and learning worldwide. Participation in all events and use of all resources is free an open to anyone. Read more

Our guests on this episode of Teachers Teaching Teachers are Cable Green, Mary Lou Foward and Karen Fasimpaur.

Cable Green, Director of Global Learning at Creative Commons. Most recently, Green was the Director of eLearning & Open Education for the Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges, where he provided leadership on strategic technology planning, openly licensing and sharing digital content, growing and improving online and hybrid learning, and implementing enterprise learning technologies and student support services. One innovative project, the Open Course Library, creates low-cost, digital, openly licensed (CC BY) instructional materials for 81 high impact community college courses. As Director of Global Learning at Creative Commons, Green is responsible for setting strategic direction and priorities to build a global movement that will enable robust and vibrant practices and policies for free sharing of education and learning assets. Cable will lead Creative Commons’ recently-announced project to provide technical assistance to winning grantees of the Department of Labor Trade Adjustment Assistance Community and Career Training Grant program.

Mary Lou Forward is the Executive Director of the OpenCourseWare Consortium, providing leadership for the organization’s efforts to support OpenCourseWare use and development globally. Prior to joining the Consortium, she served as Dean of African Studies for SIT Study Abroad. In that role, she provided academic and strategic leadership for 29 programs across the African continent, leading SIT’s incorporation of technology and distance learning in international programming and developing innovative opportunities to collaborate across countries and between diverse student groups. She has also worked on community-based development in Africa, with an emphasis on the incorporation of appropriate technologies and sustainable resources in small-scale enterprise development.

Karen Fasimpaur is an enthusiastic user of OER in K-12 classrooms. She works with teachers to help integrate, remix, and share open-licensed curriculum to engage students and differentiate instruction. Prior to this work, Karen was an educational multimedia producer, a textbook developer, and a teacher.

Click Read more to see a copy of the chat that was happening during the webcast.

21st Century Learning #81 Alec Couros on Teacher Education and Open Course Design


39:39 minutes (18.18 MB)

21st Century Learning #81
Alec Couros on Teacher Education and Open Course Design
October 24, 2008

This week Alec Couros joined us to discuss teacher education and creating an open course for pre and in-service K-12
teachers.  This course would be similar to his Open, Social, Connected course. 

Interested?  Contact Alec via Twitter or his Blog.  Alex check out his K12 Online presentation.

Not passionate about this, but know someone who might be?  Send them Alec's contact info.

See you next week with a preview of the NEIT 2008 Conference.  

 

<-- Click here for the chat transcript -->

EdTechWeekly#87


32:09 minutes (14.72 MB)
EdTechWeekly #87

July 27, 2008

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