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Elizabeth Berryman

Teachers Teaching Teachers #130 - One of the most moving experiences of my life - 11.19.08


41:01 minutes (12.95 MB)

On November 4th, Katie, a senior at the Judge Memorial Catholic High School in Salt Lake City, Utah, and her mother "coincidentally" found themselves in Chicago.

Yes, Chicago. I was there (coincidentally) on election day - November 4, 2008. This wasn't just any election in any city, though. This was THE election in THE city. It was the election that will forever make history. Obama was elected the first African-American president of the United States and I was there at Grant Park where he gave his acceptance speech. It was truly one of the most moving experiences of my life.

YES WE CAN: my experience in Grant Park on election day

When Katie got home she posted her reflections on this event on Youth Voices, a social network for students that her teacher, Chris Sloan helps to maintain. The joy in Katie's writing and in her image that she inserted with her text captured that important moment for the hundreds of other students who post their work on Youth Voices.

"I saw so many people whose faces expressed a relief that some glimmer of hope had finally come that, in fact, a black man could conquer a still very racist nation." Katie wrote in her post. "At that moment in time, our country seemed to get a little bit more accepting, and this was making people uncontrollably happy."

A Latina from Flushing, New York didn't share Katie's enthusiasm. In fact, for Dominique, an 11th grader at the East-West School for International Studies, something in what Katie had written brought to a head something that had been bothering her about the way people were
talking about Obama:

Another sentence that I found wrong and stirred up some anger is "a black man could conquer a still very racist country."  It's honestly comical. If this was " a still very racist  country " then trust me Obama would have not become President. Let me give you some valuable insight. Without the support of the Hispanic population and Caucasian population, there would be no (according to you) "First African-American President ". You believe this country is racist, but you don't realize that this country is racist because of people who exploit a certain race and make it seem that they on top of everyone else.

Incomplete

On the weekend after Dominique's comment, Chris Sloan contacted Dominique's teacher, Paul Allison, and Chris and Paul decided that it might be interesting to invite Katie and Dominique, along with another student, Farisa, to get together on Teachers Teaching Teachers to talk things over.

That's where this show begins.

In addition the students were joined by Elizabeth Berryman, Director of the PBS Teacher Center in Virginia. Elizabeth provided some follow up to a project that Susan Ettenheim's students at Eleanor Roosevelt High School in New York City participated in. We had talked with Elizbeth in an earlier show about the Video the Vote,a partnership between PBS and YouTube. On this show Elizabeth and Susan talk about how students and teachers took to this project, and Elizabeth begins to decribe the next project in which students will be invited to video the human impact of the economic crisis that we face.

Enjoy! And consider sharing this one with your students.

Teachers Teaching Teachers #124 - What does the PBS Newshour, YouTube and Youth Voices have in common? - 10.1.08


68:00 minutes (15.57 MB)

Elizabeth (Lizzy) Berryman, Director of the PBS Teacher Center in Virginia and Chris Sloan, a high school teacher in Salt Lake City, Utah joined us to talk about a collaborative project between YouTube and the PBS News Hour called “Video Your Vote." The purpose of this project is to look at the actual voting process. The project involves Flip Cams for high school teachers (especially ones in battle ground states) that want to have interview the voting age kids in the school or have students interviewing adults about the voting process. Lizzy joined us on the first half of this podcast to and answer some questions about the project.

In the second half of the show we help a teacher new to http://youthvoices.net set up a group and register her 7th graders on Youth Voices.

Do you have students in your classes who are voting for the first time?

The NewsHour and PBS are partnering with YouTube on an exciting new project called “Video Your Vote,” which will look at the health of democracy in America by focusing on issues surrounding voting and attitudes towards voting.  Each class will record and upload 10 short videos about the voting experience, contributing to a special YouTube pool of clips on the topic.

There are a variety of ways the videos can be shot. They could be perspectives from students who will be voting in the election for the first time, interviews with parents, teachers and school staff about their past voting experiences, or interviews with election officials about how they are preparing for the election and what they are expecting. Students could visit a retirement community to speak with elderly voters, or if the school will be a voting station they can talk to whoever is in charge. This project is a work in progress so we are certainly open to your ideas.

There is also a voting day component to the project. The good folks who are soponsoring this project would like students to take the cameras to the polls on Nov. 4 if possible.  This can happen in a variety of ways, but a few possibilities are sending the cameras with students voting for the first time, or accompanying a few students to a polling place to interview people after they vote. There will be a special “How To” video from YouTube that will give guidelines for video taping at the polls.

Please email Lizzy if you are interested in getting involved in this program at eberryman@newshour.org.

Click Read more, below, to see the chat transcript.
 
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