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TTT#367 Why Open Matters When We Share Curriculum - Connected Educator Month Series (2 of 5) 10.9.13


59:14 minutes (40.67 MB)

On this episode of TTT, recorded on 10.9.13 as part of our series of Connected Educator Month http://connectededucators.org shows, we explore why open matters when we share curriculum.

We are joined by:

Greg Mcverry's profile photo Greg McVerry Christina Cantrill's profile photo Christina Cantrill Johanna Paraiso's profile photo Johanna Paraiso
Karen Fasimpaur's profile photo Karen Fasimpaur Joann Boettcher's profile photo Joann Boettcher Sheri Edwards's profile photo Sheri Edwards

Here's a Digital Is http://digitalis.nwp.org/ resource on this topic, written by one of our frequent (and always welcomed) guests on TTT, Karen Fasimpaur:

Why does "open" matter?

Creative Commons Licence

There is a lot of talk about "open" these days. It's the new black. It's cool and hip, and marketeers are calling their products "open," whether they are or not.

But what does "open" really mean? And why should we care?

For the purposes of this discussion, "open" refers to content that can be remixed, modified, and redistributed by anyone.

There's an endless supply of free content on the Internet. How is open different from everything else that is free? In the United States, any content that is not public domain (by virtue of its age or designation as such by the creator) is copyrighted, whether or not it is indicated as such. Subject to certain excpeptions such as fair use, the copyright owner has exclusive rights to reproduce, prepare derivatives, and distribute the copyrighted work (section 107 of the copyright law).*

Open-licensed content, though, can be reused and redistributed without prior permission.

The most common open licenses are those provided by Creative Commons. An attachment below summarizes the various licenses and gives more info about open resources.

As educators, why should we care about open? Some of the reasons include economics, remixability, and promoting a culture of sharing. We'll explore each of these in the chapters that follow.

BROWSE THIS RESOURCE

- See more at: http://digitalis.nwp.org/resource/3837#sthash.ewnNpvyc.dpuf


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TTT#345 Detroit Future Schools & Boston w/Ammerah Saidi, Danielle Filipiak, Christina Cantrill, Fred Haas, Chris Tsang 4.17.13


70:29 minutes (48.4 MB)

On this episode of TTT we learn more about connected learning, city as school, using media in justice-based education and more!

Educators from the Detroit Future Schools (DFS) program http://schools.detroitfuture.org share their experiences of attempting to re-invent the practice and purpose of education. They discuss the transformative processes that they use in classrooms along with student-generated media projects. Furthermore, theyshare how the DFS network is growing and refining its vision. 

Enjoy this conversation with +Ammerah Saidi and +ms filipiak from Detroit Future Schools and +Christina Cantrill From the National Writing Project (NWP) in Philadelphia and leave with replicable teaching practices, ideas for school-community interactions, and links to further resources, like this post by Danielle Filipiak on the NWP's Digital Is: "My Homeland:" A Connected Learning Media exchange project between South Korean and Detroit HS Students http://digitalis.nwp.org/resource/3842

In addition we connected with +Fred Haas and +Chris Tsang from the Boston Writing Project, just after the bombing at the Marathon. 

Paul Allison's profile photoammerah saidi's profile photoms filipiak's profile photoFred Haas's profile photoChristina Cantrill's profile photomonika hardy's profile photo

Here's more about Ammerah Saidi and Danielle Filipiak:

Ammerah Saidi graduated from the University of Michigan-Dearborn with a B.A. in English and Psychology certified as a secondary teacher. For four years, Ammerah taught in Detroit, Michigan and for one year in Al Hada, Saudi Arabia at an international school. She graduated from the Harvard Graduate School of Education with a Masters in School Leadership and is a coordinator for the Detroit Future Schools Program.

Danielle Filipiak is currently a doctoral student in English Education at Teachers College-Columbia University. She is interested in the multiple ways that students use literacy to navigate the hybrid and evolving contexts/landscapes around them. She has a decade of teaching experience and have also served in roles such as: teacher organizer, consultant, NWP Urban Sites leadership team member, school board member, co-founder of the Detroit Educator Network, and member of the Detroit Future Media program, a digital justice initiative in Detroit looking to reinvent the practice and purpose of educaiton.

Here are some of the resources Danielle describes on this episode of TTT: 

 


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Teachers Teaching Teachers #254 - What happens when a brewer becomes a teacher? Meet Tommy Buteau (plus Chad Sansing) 07.06.11


48:00 minutes (10.99 MB) On this episode of Teachers Teaching Teachers, meet Tommy Buteau and learn more about Chad Sansing and the Cooperative Catalyst. Tommy recently wrote Paul Allison.
Paul,

I read about the Youth Voices project at the Digital Is site, and I think it sounds very interesting, like something I would use with my 9th and 11th grade English classes here in Windsor, CO. So, I visited the site and signed up, but it seems like I do not have access to everything. I can only see three of the guides that you use, and the directions for most of the activities seem limited. I enjoyed the free-writing article by Peter Elbow, and I also like the 10 questions activity. I am wondering if there is a description of how teachers use this site somewhere. 
Thanks, 
Tommy Buteau 
That’s not all, a couple of days later Tommy wrote:
Have you ever used your site for cross-campus peer reviews before? I found that when students from another school did a peer review, the results were great. We used google docs for it. You can see what I did with a creative writing class at https://sites.google.com/site/101wright1/creative-writing-2010-2. Then, we did a similar process with speech podcasts athttp://schoolweb.psdschools.org/frhs/LangArts/SP/Buteau/index.html. I think the key is that it was completely anonymous.
Thanks, 

We couldn't wait to welcome Tommy into our community and to learn more about his work. We were also delighted to welcome Chad Sansing back to TTT. You can see the results of the challenge we threw to him on TTT #256 - Cooperative Catalyst.

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Teachers Teaching Teachers #225 - Celebrating the launch of the National Writing Project's new site - Digital Is - 11-03-10


46:37 minutes (10.67 MB) Congratulations to all involved in the National Writing Project’s (NWP) new Digital Is site, which launched the first week of November when we recorded this podcast!

Take a look at all the wonderful work that has been collected and curated so far by NWP teachers from all over the United States at http//digitalis.nwp.org/

Once you’ve checked out those great resources and provocations, listen to the creators, collectors, and curators of this exciting new site on this episode of Teachers Teaching Teachers.

As Christina Cantrill wirtes:

The National Writing Project’s Digital Is website is a teaching-focused knowledge base exploring digital writing, teaching and learning. It invites participation in developing this knowledge base in several ways – visitors can find a range of teaching-focused collections and resources here related to digital writing, teaching and learning as well as become community members and participate in discussions. Also, after participating and getting a sense of the site, one can write to us and apply to be a resource creator. Resource creators can draft and compose multimodal resources here, get and give feedback to other resource creators, and publish.

Paul Allison, Susan Ettenheim, and Chris Sloan welcomed five of our friends and colleagues to this episode of Teachers Teaching Teachers:

picture-8.jpg Christina Cantrill who works at the National Writing Project as a Senior Program Associate for the NWP Technology Initiative and Digital Is project

.picture-24.jpg Bud Hunt, who made this collection on Digital Is: What’s New, or What’s Good: On Writing Connectively.

picture-9.jpg  Elyse Eidman-Aadahl who directs National Programs and Site Development at the National Writing Project. She also moderates one of our favorite webcasts/podcasts, NWP Radio.

educon22 Bill Fitzgerald who runs the Drupal shop, FunnyMonkey. Bill designed Digital Is, and is currently working on an update of Youth Voices.

Kevin+Hodgson Kevin Hodgson teaches sixth grade in Southampton, Massachusetts at the William E. Norris Elementary School. He is also the technology liaison with the Western Massachusetts Writing Project. Check out how many different ways Kevin shows up on Digital Is!

We talked with our friends about the importance of commenting. Over the last several years, those of us who have been building Youth Voices have learned how important it is to teach and nurture commenting, not just posting new posts all the time.

Join the excitement! Digital Is promises to be an important touchstone for communities of learners in the National Writing Project and beyond, and we suspect that the quality of the discussions on the site will soon be as important as the quality of the resources.

With this episode of TTT, we celebrate the launch of Digital Is and to think about the role of commenting in building new communities of learning on this site.

Unfortunately the chat log for this podcast is unavailable.

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