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Jennifer Maddrell

Instructional-Design-Live #27 Online Teaching: Susan Ko


32:31 minutes (14.89 MB)

Susan Ko Susan Ko, Executive Director of the Center of Teaching Excellence at University of Maryland University College, published the first edition of Teaching Online: A Practical Guide 10 years ago. The third edition, published this year, reflects a number of changes that have happened in the field over that last several years such as the: Web 2.0 revolution, growing acceptance of online education, need for special training and continuing support for faculty and students, team course development, growth of open educational resources, and increasing use of mobile devices.

With unassuming clarity, Susan addresses a number of key issues facing designers and faculty in higher (and K-12) education today.

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Aug 20, 2010 10:01:49 AM - IDL 27: SUSAN KO--PRACTICAL ONLINE TEACHING
02:31 - Robert: http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9780415997263/
03:31 - Jennifer: oooh! A kindle edition, too! http://www.amazon.com/Teaching-Online-Practical-Guide-ebook/dp/B003AU7E8...
05:38 - Jennifer: What about synchronous teaching options? Is this changing the face of online learning in your experience?
16:31 - Jennifer: how have "perceptions" of oline learning changed (or not) over the years? perceptions of quality, satisfaction, faculty buy-in, etc?
24:05 - Jason: Neiffer: Sure
24:19 - Robert: yes
25:41 - Jennifer: @jason ... I think k-12 is going to be a HUGE driver in online learning ... esp. taking online learning from being for "alternative" adult learners to far more maintream
29:13 - Jennifer: @jason ... good point re: importance of taking an online course (or program) to "get it"
30:30 - Marlene: Yes, continuous improvement is an important aspect of online teaching.
30:42 - Jason Neiffer: Good question, Robert...
31:53 - Jennifer: Great! Thank you, Susan ... another fun virtual "brown bag" lunch for me :)
32:38 - Marlene: Thanks, Susan!
32:38 - Jason Neiffer: Thanks everyone! :)

Instructional-Design-Live #24 AECT Research Symposium Papers


36:19 minutes (16.62 MB)

In a slight departure from our traditional format, we discuss several research papers that are being presented ataect the Association for Educational Communications and Technology Research Symposium being held in Bloomington, Indiana from July 20 - July 23. Jennifer Maddrell, presenting on the influence of Backchannel Communication on Cognitive Load, discusses her paper and several others in this 30 minute discussion.

Instructional-Design-Live#23 2010-07-09 Case-Based Learning Online


39:05 minutes (17.89 MB)

Solvr

Xiaojing Liu, Senior Research Analyst at Kelley Business School, Indiana University, joins us this week to discuss how to design effective online cased-based learning courses.  Drawing on her research into cased based-learning startegies used in an MBA program, Dr. Liu considers the benefits and challenges of case-based learning from both a student and faculty perspective.

Instructional-Design-Live#22 2010-06-18 E-Portfolios


41:57 minutes (19.21 MB)

Dr. Helen Barrett, recipient of the EIFEL lifetime achievement award for her contributions to e-portfolio research and development, joins us this week to put a firm emphasis on having students control their learning through e-portfolios. In addition to highlighting the ‘two faces of e-portfolios’, Helen makes the case that universities have been placing too great an emphasis on e-portfolios for summative learning. 

 

Instructional-Design-Live#21 2010-06-11 Revisiting Cognitive Overload


33:12 minutes (15.2 MB)

Stroop Test

Having recently discussed the need to avoid cognitive overload in online courses, we take a step back to consider whether or not cognitive overload is actually an issue. As Arlene Walker-Andrews, Associate Provost and Psychology Professor at the University of Montana, points out: “I do not believe that attention and cognitive capacities are limited. In my view, attention shouldn’t be considered a finite resource, rather it should be characterized as “attending,” which suggests flexible, skilled action. Recent theories about attention suggest that although not all stimuli are analyzed, nonattended stimuli are not all filtered out and their impact on learning and memory will vary depending on relevance and/or personal experience.” Great stuff!

Join Arlene and the ID team this week to listen to what this means for individualizing the learning experience and tailoring instructional strategies to the cognitive abilities of learners.

 

 

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Arlene's Notes for the Discussion

 

Chat Transcipt: Jun 11, 2010 10:05:22 AM - IDL 21: COGNITIVE OVERLOAD 'REVISITED'
 
 

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