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TTT#375 Hour of Code and Dasani w/ Nikhil Goyal, Maurya Couvares, Mia Zamora, Kim Douillard, Stephanie West-Puckett 12.11.13


66:12 minutes (45.45 MB)

On this episode of TTT, recorded on 12.11.13, join Nikhil Goyal nikhilgoyal.me/about/ , Maurya Couvares @MauryaCouvares , Mia Zamora @MiaZamoraPhD , Kim Douillard @kd0602 , and Stephanie West-Puckett @fieldpeaz as they help us make connections between Hour of Code http://csedweek.org/ and the recent "Dasani: Invisible Child" series in the New York Times http://www.nytimes.com/projects/2013/invisible-child/#/?chapt=1

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Pat Delaney wasn't able to join us but he sent along this provocation: http://weedingthecollection.wordpress.com/2013/12/11/ignoring-what-most-schools-dont-teach/

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Monika Hardy exploreed the juxtaposition of Hour of Code with Dasani, when she wrote in an email:

I think the stories of Leo http://redefineschool.com/leo-grand/ and Marc http://redefineschool.com/marc-roth/ fit in nicely as well.

Freire's - how to have liberation without trust.. esp the story behind Leo and Patrick: Did we trust a homeless black man could code? Did we trust a young white tech entrepreneur wasn't just wanting to look good in his offer?

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ScriptEd's co-founder, Maurya Couvares http://www.scripted.org suggested:

You might want to read this article. One of our students wrote it -- I think it might a good talking point for [this episode of TTT]: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/bill-nyarko/learning-to-computer-program_b_4098707.html

ScriptEd teaches computer programming to students in low resource high schools, and places its students in internships with technology firms.


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TTT#321 Exploring EduCon 2013 with Meenoo Rami, Chad Sansing, Mary Beth Hertz, Paul Oh, Sam Reed, Chris Lehmann 9.31.12


66:52 minutes (45.92 MB)

On this episode of TTT, we learn more about EduCon2013 with our guests:

Meenoo Rami, Chad Sansing, Mary Beth Hertz, Paul Oh, Sam Reed, and Chris Lehmann

Paul Allison's profile photoMeenoo Rami's profile photoChad Sansing's profile photoMaryBeth Hertz's profile photoPaul Oh's profile photosam reed's profile photomonika hardy's profile photoChris Lehmann's profile photo

What's EduCon? http://educonphilly.org

"Educon is both a conversation and a conference."

It is an innovation conference where we can come together, both in person and virtually, to discuss the future of schools. Every session will be an opportunity to discuss and debate ideas - from the very practical to the big dreams.

The Axioms: The guiding principles behind Educon:

1) Our schools must be inquiry-driven, thoughtful and empowering for all members
2) Our schools must be about co-creating - together with our students - the 21st Century Citizen
3) Technology must serve pedagogy, not the other way around
4) Technology must enable students to research, create, communicate and collaborate
5) Learning can - and must - be networked

Questions? Comments? Email: educon@scienceleadership.org

Register to attend EduCon 2.5 educonphilly.org


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TTT #291 What we talk about when we talk about Trayvon Martin with Ashleigh Dennis, Al Elliott and Kiseem - 04.04.12


48:00 minutes (10.99 MB)

On this episode of Teachers Teaching Teachers we talk about what we talk about when we talk about Trayvon Martin #trayvonmartin. What have you been talking to your students about this? 

Here are some of the things that have been going up on Youth Voices the past few weeks: http://youthvoices.net/taxonomy/term/33223 And follow this link to find some of the the articles we have been reading and annotating together. (Once in the "Mission," click on each individual title to see students' comments.) http://youthvoices.net/node/36643

Recently, when I (Paul Allison) walked into my teachers room, it took about 4 seconds of talking about what my students were doing for three African-American colleagues to talk in wide-ranging ways about violence and protecting children and dress and racism, and more. I just listened as carefully as I could, trying to learn what their questions were.

We made an open invitation to teachers to come talkttt291bout Trayvon Martin at EdTechTalk http://edtechtalk.com. Paul Allison, Chris Sloan and Monika Hardy hosted this conversation with Ashleigh Dennis , Al Elliott and Kiseem, one of Paul's students.

We agree with what Dan Cantor wrote recently on the Working Families blogs: "What is new and welcome is that more and more white people are reminded or learning for the first time what the persistent existence of the color line means to millions of our fellow Americans." http://www.workingfamiliesparty.org/2012/04/my-son-doesnt-look-like-trayvon/

We think this episode of TTT will add to the conversations you might be having with students and colleagues -- or you wish your were having. Let us know your thoughts by commenting below.


ETT21 #164: COPPA: Children's Online Privacy Protection Act


29:01 minutes (13.34 MB) EdTechTalk21 #164: COPPA: Children's Online Privacy Protection Act
February 8, 2012

Curt LieneckBill Stites Curt Lieneck, Director of Information Technology, University of Chicago Laboratory Schools and Bill Stites, Director of Technology and Montclair Kimberly Academy join us to discuss how their schools are dealing with the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act.  






Teachers Teaching Teachers #245 - Meet the New Youth Voices - An open meeting where we talk about the recent upgrade - 4.27.11


62:50 minutes (14.38 MB)

On this episode of Teachers Teaching Teachers, a group of us who are in the process of launching a new version of Youth Voices met to continue the process of building the technology and the pedegogy of our work together.

Youth Voices is a school-based social network that was started in 2003 by a group of National Writing Project teachers. We merged several earlier blogging projects, preferring to bring our students together in one site that would live beyond any particular class, where it would be easier for individual students to connect with other students, comment on each others work, and create multimedia posts for each other. Further we thought it made sense for us to pool our knowledge about curriculum and digital literacies. If being part of such a community makes sense to you, we invite you to join us too. We work to embrace any teacher who is interested to have their students publish online and participate in the give and take of a social network like Youth Voices.

Youth Voices is much more than a website or a social network. It is also a welcoming community of teachers who have been planning curriculum together for many years. In addition to being active members in our local Writing Projects and the National Writing Project, many of us also count ourselves as member of the World Bridges community, and we meet regularly via Skype on a weekly webcast/podcast, Teachers Teaching Teachers, which has been going live every Wednesday evening at EdTechTalk since 2006.

All of this collaboration and talk, these years of building curriculum and working on the web together have led to to consider: What do the Youth Voices/Teachers Teaching Teachers teachers love about this work? And why do we think any kindergarten - college teacher might also find to love there too? What we think you and your students will find on Youth Voices, what we keeps us coming back, what we strive to engender, what we will never give up on (even in a school) is involving our students in “authentic conversation.”

Over the years the teachers who have been working together to grow Youth Voices have learned that as important questions_bgas it is to have students publish multi-media, well-crafted products, it is at least as important to nurture, guide, and allow time for students to write comments and to develop conversations about each others discussion posts. Our mission at Youth Voices is to be a place online where students from across the nation (and globally, when possible) can engage other young people in conversations about real topics that they see happening in the world. We want our students to be immersed in lively, voiced give-and-take with their peers.

(For more, please read this resource at the National Writing Project's Digital Is site, "Authentic Conversations on Youth Voices.")

Click Read more to see a copy of the chat that was happening during the webcast.
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