Skip to Content

blogging

TTT#371 Social Media in Schools? Paige Woodard, Jo Paraiso and her students: Bassam Taleb, Katia Navidad, Jorge Espinoza 11.6.13


61:11 minutes (42.01 MB)

On this episode of TTT we discuss social media in education with several high school students. We are joined by:

Paige is on a mission, and we learn a lot by when Joanna's students who are working on http://youthvoices.net join her in this conversation.

Here's what Paige wrote recently on Shane Haggerty's blog http://publicassemblypr.com/2013/10/31/what-i-learned-one-students-mission/:

Changing the education system is difficult, but tangible.

For the past three months I have focused on integrating social media into the education system and, surprisingly, have found countless administrators, teachers, and social media gurus alike that are passionate about assisting me in my mission.

My social media education mission began with a simple Twitter account and blog on WordPress, yet my ultimate goal is to film a DVD to sell to school administrators that will explain why social media is beneficial in the classroom and how it can be incorporated into the curriculum.

Paige also writes (in an email):

I am really interested in students' responsibility on social media and why they should monitor what they share, as college admissions and future employers alike research you on social media before accepting you into their college/university or allow you to represent their business.

I am also advocating for social media usage in the classroom because it exposes students to countless opportunities unavailable to them in their school district. As an example, without the use of social media and networking, I would not have made a presentation to Howard Rheingold's class at Stanford University.

I am happy to brainstorm any other ideas as well.

Want more? Here's Howard Rheingold's interview with Paige and and her teacher, Don Wettrick, "Freedom, Autonomy, and Digital Media at an Indiana High School" http://dmlcentral.net/blog/howard-rheingold/freedom-autonomy-and-digital-media-indiana-high-school


Click Read more to see the chat that was happening during this live webcast.


TTT#359 Scaffolding the Blogging Process with Teachers in the Dakota Writing Project's Digital Writing Sandbox 7.31.13


66:42 minutes (45.8 MB)

Michelle Rogge Gannon and I invite you to join us on this episode of TTT (which was recorded 7.31.13). Earlier in the summer, Michelle wrote:

Some of the teachers in the Dakota Writing Project Digital Writing Sandbox are asking for resources on scaffolding the blogging process and on evaluating blog entries. I wondered if you might have some resources that you would be willing to share or if you could point to some that might be useful.

"Scaffolding the blogging process and evaluating blog entries" sounded like a great discussion to for Teachers Teaching Teachers, so we invited Michelle and her colleagues to join us toward the end of July.

In addition to these questions, we also asked about anything that these teachers are learning together in the Dakota Writing Project Sandbox, which is described on their web site http://sites.usd.edu/dwp/sandbox :

Taking a 21st-century approach, the Dakota Writing Project Digital Writing Marathon provides educators with a thoughtful, intensive, collaborative exploration of a variety of technology environments and strategies for integrating writing and adapting these technologies appropriately for the classroom. The marathon is offered entirely online, with both synchronous (real-time) and asynchronous communication and activities, with the majority of online work occurring in July 2013, January 2014, and May 2014. The marathon is taught by Dakota Writing Project teacher-consultants with extensive experience in integrating writing and technology for the classroom.

It was a lot of fun to meet and speak with these wonderful educators:

Jennifer Harvey's profile photo Jennifer Harvey Anne Moege's profile photo Anne Moege Michelle Rogge Gannon's profile photo Michelle Rogge Gannon
Valerie Burton's profile photo Valerie Burton Steve Gors's profile photo Steve Gors Samantha Peil's profile photoSamantha Peil

Enjoy!

TTT#330 Quadblogging 2 with Cliff Manning, David Mitchell, Gail Desler, Linda Yollis, Matt Hardy, Sue Waters, Suzi Boss 1.9.13


68:28 minutes (47.01 MB)

We are joined by colleagues from England and Australia on this episode of TTT as we follow-up with them on an earler conversations about blogging in elementary schools: http://edtechtalk.com/node/5156.

Our goal is simple: we want to make plans for elementary school students to find and respond to each others blog posts this spring. Joining us on this episode of TTT are Makewaves’ Cliff Manning, KidBlog’s Matt Hardy, Sue Waters from EduBlogs, and some of us are from Youth Voices. We are also joined by David Mitchell, the Quadblogging guru and Linda Yollis an elementary school teacher in Los Angeles who Quadblogs her own way.

Suzie Boss describes Quadblogging like this in a September 25, 2012 post in Edutopia:

The idea is deceptively simple. Four teachers agree to have their students comment on each other's blogs in an organized fashion. Each week, one of the four gets a turn as the spotlight class. The other three classes visit and leave comments. Over the course of a month, every student's work gets read and commented upon. Along the way, students learn about respectful online communication. They may decide to revise their thinking if a commenter shares a perspective they haven't considered.

On this episode of TTT Paul Allison, @paulallison is joined by Cliff Manning, @cliffmanning, Sue Waters, @suewaters, David Mitchell, @DeputyMitchell, Gail Desler, @gaildesler, Linda Yollis, @lindayollis, Matt Hardy, @hardy101, and Suzie Boss, @suzieboss.

Paul Allison's profile photoCliff Manning's profile photoSue Waters's profile photoDavid Mitchell's profile photoGail Desler's profile photoLinda Yollis's profile photoMatt Hardy's profile photoSuzie Boss's profile photo

On his blog, David Mitchell describes Quadblogging like this:

QuadBlogging is a leg up to an audience for your class/school blog. Over the last 12 months 100,000 pupils have been involved in QuadBlogging from 3000 classes in 40 countries....

A Blog needs an audience to keep it alive for your learners. Too often blogs wither away leaving the learners frustrated and bored. Quadblogging gives your blog a truly authentic and global audience that will visit your blog, leave comments and return on a cycle. Here’s how it works:

You sign up using the form below, shortly after, you will be allocated a Quad four schools/classes including your own. Each Quad has a co-ordinator who is responsible for making sure each of the quad members know what is going on and when. Each week one blog is the focus blog with the other three blogs visiting and commenting during that week. In week two, another school/class blog is the focus with the other three visiting and commenting. This is repeated until each of the classes/schools has had their week in the spotlight. The cycle is then repeated. However, this time, your pupils know what is coming – They will work harder than you have seen them work in order to get content on their blog!

QuadBlogging has been mentioned very highly in recent OfSTED Reports here in the UK and praised for offering opportunities for:“profound impact in developing pupils’ team working, communication and problem-solving skills.”

It’s simple – Give it a try, sign up here.

Enjoy!

Teachers Teaching Teachers #245 - Meet the New Youth Voices - An open meeting where we talk about the recent upgrade - 4.27.11


62:50 minutes (14.38 MB)

On this episode of Teachers Teaching Teachers, a group of us who are in the process of launching a new version of Youth Voices met to continue the process of building the technology and the pedegogy of our work together.

Youth Voices is a school-based social network that was started in 2003 by a group of National Writing Project teachers. We merged several earlier blogging projects, preferring to bring our students together in one site that would live beyond any particular class, where it would be easier for individual students to connect with other students, comment on each others work, and create multimedia posts for each other. Further we thought it made sense for us to pool our knowledge about curriculum and digital literacies. If being part of such a community makes sense to you, we invite you to join us too. We work to embrace any teacher who is interested to have their students publish online and participate in the give and take of a social network like Youth Voices.

Youth Voices is much more than a website or a social network. It is also a welcoming community of teachers who have been planning curriculum together for many years. In addition to being active members in our local Writing Projects and the National Writing Project, many of us also count ourselves as member of the World Bridges community, and we meet regularly via Skype on a weekly webcast/podcast, Teachers Teaching Teachers, which has been going live every Wednesday evening at EdTechTalk since 2006.

All of this collaboration and talk, these years of building curriculum and working on the web together have led to to consider: What do the Youth Voices/Teachers Teaching Teachers teachers love about this work? And why do we think any kindergarten - college teacher might also find to love there too? What we think you and your students will find on Youth Voices, what we keeps us coming back, what we strive to engender, what we will never give up on (even in a school) is involving our students in “authentic conversation.”

Over the years the teachers who have been working together to grow Youth Voices have learned that as important questions_bgas it is to have students publish multi-media, well-crafted products, it is at least as important to nurture, guide, and allow time for students to write comments and to develop conversations about each others discussion posts. Our mission at Youth Voices is to be a place online where students from across the nation (and globally, when possible) can engage other young people in conversations about real topics that they see happening in the world. We want our students to be immersed in lively, voiced give-and-take with their peers.

(For more, please read this resource at the National Writing Project's Digital Is site, "Authentic Conversations on Youth Voices.")

Click Read more to see a copy of the chat that was happening during the webcast.

21st Century Learning #121: What does Blogging Look Like in 2010?


22:23 minutes (10.28 MB)

 

Syndicate content