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teacher voice

TTT#368 Connected Ed-Teacher Voice w/ Meenoo Rami, Kevin Hodgson, Karen Fasimpaur, Jo Paraiso, Chad Sansing, Maribeth Whitehouse


61:44 minutes (42.39 MB)

Teacher voice is our theme on this episode of TTT recorded on 10.16.13 in the middle of Connected Educators Month http://connectededucators.org/. Raising teacher voice is an ongoing theme on TTT, and we welcomed this opportunity to re-join the conversations that we hosted in May and June, 2013:

  • TTT#351 Teachers Speaking Up http://edtechtalk.com/node/5198
    On this... episode... we talk about how, when, why, and where to speak up!
     
  • TTT#353 Teachers Speaking Uphttp://edtechtalk.com/node/5200
    A provocative conversation about Teachers Speaking Up w/@AndreaZellner, @KSchulten, @StevenZemelman, @Ochoajen @MsSandersTHS, @meenoorami, and Pat Delaney

On this episode of TTT we are joined by:

Meenoo Rami's profile photo Meenoo Rami Kevin Hodgson's profile photo Kevin Hodgson Karen Fasimpaur's profile photo Karen Fasimpaur
Johanna Paraiso's profile photo Johanna Paraiso Chandler Sansing's profile photo Chandler Sansing Maribeth Whitehouse's profile photo Maribeth Whitehouse


Click Read more to see the chat that was happening during this live webcast,
and to find links to several of the resources shared during this episode of TTT.

TTT#351 Teachers Speaking Up w/ Jesse Hagopian, Diana Laufenberg, José Vilson, Steven Zemelman, Pat Delaney, Maribeth Whitehouse


65:56 minutes (45.27 MB)

We invite you to consider how you might speak up a bit more, tell your stories as a teacher, and assert your leadership. On this week's episode of TTT (recorded 5/29/13), we talk about how, when, why, and where to speak up! We discuss how teachers become leaders by loosing fear, speaking up, telling their stories, and taking collective action. Join us for the next installment of a series of shows about teachers speaking up on Wednesday, June 19, 2013 at 9PM ET/6PM PT.

Our guests on this episode are:

Jesse Hagpian, Diana Laufenberg, Jose Vilson, Steve Zemelman, Patrick Delaney, Maribeth Whitehouse

Jesse Hagopian's profile photo Diana Laufenberg's profile photo Jose Vilson's profile photo Steven Zemelman's profile photo Patrick Delaney's profile photo Maribeth Whitehouse's profile photo

Jesse Hagopian, a high school history teacher and union representative at Garfield High School who refused to administer the MAP standardized test in January. Recently, the school district backed down, announcing that the Measures of Academic Progress, or MAP test, is now optional for high schools. http://iamaneducator.com/ | https://twitter.com/JessedHagopian. Jesse is a public high school teacher in Seattle and a founding member of Social Equality Educators (SEE). He is a contributing author to Education and Capitalism: Struggles for Learning and Liberation and 101 Changemakers: Rebels and Radicals Who Changed US History (Haymarket Books). Hagopian serves on the Board of Directors of Maha-Lilo—“Many Hands, Light Load”—a Haiti solidarity organization.

Diana Laufenberg describes herself as a farm kid turned Science Leadership Academy teache, now taking a year to consult, travel and learn. http://laufenberg.wordpress.com/ | https://twitter.com/dlaufenberg. She has taught all grade levels from 7-12 in Social Studies and she has most recently been a teacher with the Science Leadership Academy in Philadelphia, an inquiry-driven, project-based high school focused on modern learning. Diana's practice has deep roots in experiential education, taking students from the classroom to the real world and back again. Before finding her way to Philadelphia, she was an active member of the teaching community in Flagstaff, AZ where she was named Technology Teacher of the Year for Arizona and a member of the Governor’s Master Teacher Corps. Recently Diana was featured on TED.com for the “How to Learn? From Mistakes” talk and recognized for earning National Board Certification. Her publications include a featured piece on the New York Times Learning blog, co-authoring a chapter in an educational leadership book, an upcoming article in the Journal of Adolescent and Adult Literacy and regular contributions to teachinghistory.org.

José Luis Vilson is a math educator for a middle school in the Inwood / Washington Heights neighborhood of New York, NY. He graduated with a bachelor’s degree in computer science from Syracuse University and a master’s degree in mathematics education from the City College of New York. He’s also a committed writer, activist, web designer, and father. He co-authored the book Teaching 2030: What We Must Do For Our Students and Public Schools … Now and In The Future with Dr. Barnett Berry and 11 other accomplished teachers. He currently serves as the president emeritus of the Latino Alumni Network of Syracuse University, as a board member on the Board of Directors for the Center for Teaching Quality, and has been a part of the Acentos Foundation, LATinos In Social Media (LATISM), the Capicu Poetry Group, BlogCritics, and the AfroSpear.He writes for Edutopia, GOOD, and TransformED / Future of Teaching, and has written for CNN.com, Education Week, Huffington Post, and El Diario / La Prensa NY. He has also spoken at TEDxNYED and the Save Our Schools March.- See more at: http://thejosevilson.com/about/#sthash.VTpt98UX.dpuf

Steven Zemelman, one of the conveners of http://teachersspeakup.com/ and much more. Steve directs the Illinois Writing Project, and works to build long-term sustainability of school improvement. He works on literacy, whole-school development, and teacher leadership. With several partners he has written numerous professional texts, including the latest edition of Best Practice now subtitled Bringing Standards to Life in America’s Classrooms; plus 13 Steps to Teacher Empowerment: Taking a More Active Role in Your School Community; Content Area Writing: Every Teacher’s Guide; Subjects Matter: Every Teacher’s Guide to Content Area Reading; Rethinking High School; History Comes Home: Family Stories Across the Curriculum; and A Community of Writers: Teaching Composition in the Junior and Senior High School. Formerly he directed the Center for City Schools at National-Louis University.

Patrick Delaney is a recently retired librarian from Galileo Academy of Science and Technology in San Francisco. He has been a Bay Area Writing Project (CA) teacher-consultant for decades, and has been a leader in technology work in the National Writing Project. Pat has been a mentor and a friend of educational bloggers and collective teacher voice for many years. Here's where to find him now: Weeding the Collection.

Maribeth Whitehouse is a special education teacher at IS 190 in the Bronx. She is in her ninth year of teaching eighth grade. She is a teacher-leader in Lehman College's Mathematics Teacher Transfromation Institutes. Maribeth publishes under a few different pseudonymns as well as under her own name, for example: "Measuring My Value" | https://plus.google.com/117378500106053922800/posts

Related Episode of Teachers Teaching Teachers: TTT #287 Losing fear with Steve Hargadon, Anne Simonen, Maribeth Whitehouse, Delia Downing, Chad Sansing, Mary Beth Hertz 3.7.12


Click Read more to see the chat that was happening during this live webcast.


Teachers Teaching Teachers #191 - Katherine Schulten and the Learning Network AND "...making the case for the NWP - 03.10.10


67:03 minutes (15.35 MB)

In the first half of thKS1larger.jpgis weeks episode of Teachers Teaching Teachers, we had an inspiring conversation with Katherine Schulten editor of The Learning Network at the New York Times.  Our theme for this week's Teachers Teaching Teachers was about increasing teacher voice in public debates. Katherine suggested how we might use The Learning Network for that.

In addition, we were joined by:

  • Elyse Eidman-Aadahl, director of National Programs and Site Development at the National Writing Project, University of California, Berkeley
  • and Andrea Zellner a leader at the Red Cedar Writing Project, Michigan State University's site of the NWP.

Andrea and many o

thers in the chat room during the webcast gave witness to why we want to maintain federal funding for the NWP to continue -- an example of a time wh

en we need to get our voices to be heard! 

"It's been a heady week for teaching and learning discussion on the Times site," writes Katherine Schulten, our first guest on this podcast. One of Katherine's jobs as an editor of the New York Times Learning Network is to moderate the comments that come in on education-related articles.

A Student Opinion post from earlier this week, "Where Do You Stand on Unconcealed Handguns? "received many lively responses from "students 13 and older," who "are invited [to the Learning Network] to comment on questions about issues in the news."

If you just clicked on those links, your head is probably spinning: so many issues so little time! That's what it feels like to have a conversation with Katherine Schulten, who before she became an editor for the Learning Network was a NYC teacher and a consultant for the New York City Writing Project. Katherine was worried that she was talking too much, because she is so excited about managing the Learning Network.

We'll turned Katherine loose, then we interrupted her with a few questions. We think you'l learn a lot about the New York Times Learning Network on this podcast:

Currently, they are offering these features:

  • Lesson Plans — Daily lesson plans based on New York Times content.
  • Student Opinion — News-related questions that invite response from students age 13 and older.
  • Word of the Day — Vocabulary words in the context of recent Times articles.
  • 6 Q’s About the Newss — An activity in which students answer basic questions (Who, What, Where, When, Why and How) about an article.
  • News Quiz — Interactive daily news quizzes on current top stories.
  • Student Crossword — Topical puzzles geared toward teens.

The award-winning Learning Network was created in the fall of 1998. In October 2009, they re-launched it as a Times blog.

Click Read more to see a copy of the chat that was happening during the webcast.

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